Duck Availability for January-March 2016

mommyduck

New Year Greetings from Duckduckbro in Baclayon!

If you’re looking for free-range ducks to serve, we got them!

Our ducks are the Muscovy variety, also known as Barbary Duck. At the moment, we have 10 ducks to dispatch until the end of January. In end of February, there will be 5 more available. By end of March to beginning of April, there will be at least 15 ducks available. These ducks are at least 4 months old, providing fantastic, lean and tender duck meat.

We also have native chickens which are a very important non-meat breed of chickens known for their extraordinary flavour. If you are interested, we have 5 available, and by end of February, will have 10 more ready to dispatch, then another 10 by end of March.

If you’re interested in further expanding Bohol’s culinary experience, please help us reduce our growing duck (and native chicken) population! Please buy Barbary! Details are provided below.

Best wishes,

Fatima at Duckduckbro!

About Our Ducks

Our ducks are allowed to free-range in the garden with their own pond for swimming. They eat commercial feeds combined with chopped or grated coconuts, chopped banana trunks, taro roots and unripe jackfruits. The baby ducklings are kept in a separate pen to protect them from crushing. They are fed commercial booster feeds or hog grower feeds, and at 6 weeks old are let out into the garden with the older ducks.

How Much Our Ducks (and Native Chickens) Cost

Dressed Ducks (Barbary Ducks)

(These are ducks less than 6 months old so the meat is softer. These are prepared with head and feet intact. Liver, heart and gizzard are included. Let us know if you would like to include the intestines and blood. Place your order at least two days in advance so that your duck can be prepared).

Dressed Duck 250 pesos per kilo

For orders/inquiries contact:

Fatima Lasay

Email: fats.lasay@gmail.com

Make an appointment to visit:

Call or Text Fatima/Penny

Mobile: +63 9298057723

Our location:

San Roque, Baclayon, Bohol, Philippines


Do We Deliver?

We’re thinking about it! We’re so low-tech we don’t even have a vehicle. But we can hire a neighbour with a tricycle to deliver to your place or we can commute some ducks! 😉 So that’ll be extra cost. Contact us and we’ll talk about it.

See our ducks online at http://www.duckduckbro.com/

Socialise with our ducks at https://www.facebook.com/duckduckbro

Don’t Know How to Cook Duck????

With some 3 to 5 ducks, you can feed the whole town! 🙂

Cooking with Duck

Earlier this year, my sister treated us to a fantastic meal at a Cantonese restaurant in Quezon City. We ordered the duck, of course! Now if I remember correctly, this was a duck served 3 ways (or was it 4)? Anyway, the duck found in Chinese restaurants are usually the pekin duck and not the muscovy or barbary duck.

Both pekin and muscovy are domestic duck breeds. The pekin breed is descended from the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and the muscovy duck breed is descended from the muscovy (Cairina moschata).

The meat of the pekin duck is probably what most people are familiar with since it is the staple in many Chinese restaurants. This duck meat is quite fatty and moist and imparts a taste and flavour that is typically associated with “duck” flavour. The meat of the muscovy duck, however, is quite different. It is not as fatty and it has a flavour much closer to that of sirloin steak or beef.

Anyway, here are a few photos of the meal at the Chinese restaurant. Typically, the duck is baked and the meat is carefully carved. The meat is used to prepare a number of dishes (such as chopped and mixed with vegetables and spices, and eaten by wrapping in lettuce; or wrapped in rice paper with onion leeks and hoisin sauce), and the bones used to make soup. The idea is to use the whole duck to serve a fantastic meal.

Here is a fantastic video I found on The Lexicon of Food (below), showing how duck can be prepared from beak to butt! – nothing wasted. This looks more like muscovy duck meat to me! I love it totally – definitely a must try!

Happy New Year! 🙂

Ducks Mimic Eating Motions

Shortly after feeding the ducks this afternoon, I noticed this unusual behaviour amongst a couple of mature female ducks. These are mature egg-laying duck hens. They have just finished eating when they began to mimic the sweeping motions of feeding with their beaks. Here are two videos showing this peculiar behaviour. The second video shows the ducks stretching their necks, moving their heads upwards.

I assumed it was part of a mating ritual but the first video might dispute this, where there is a mature male duck (drake) nearby, drinking from a plastic basin, and inadvertently pushing one of the duck hens aside, a bit of a scuffle ensuing.

Do you know what this behaviour means?

17 Portraits

I was able to spend some time with the ducks and take these photos before it started to rain.

Focus on: Passion Flower

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Passion Flower

This is the beautiful enchanting flower of the Passiflora edulis, or the passion flower. The plant is a vine and the fruits ripen from a green to a yellow colour. The fruit is pulpy, containing numerous edible seeds, with a distinct sweet aroma. This is one of few plants that survived the drought from February-June of this year.

The seeds of this plant are now available for Seed Save and Swap!

passionfruits

Open-Pollinated Seeds (OP) from the OPA

We visited the Office of the Provincial Agriculturist (OPA) and availed of these open-pollinated seeds free of charge. Seed dispersal is one of many on-going projects of the Bohol OPA. See more at their website.

These are the seeds we got – so colourful! The colours indicate the seeds have been treated with fungicide to prevent fungi from spoiling stored seeds.

opaseeds

In the meantime, our own Seed Save and Swap Season 1 (2015) is ongoing! Learn more at Backyard Seeds.

From Wikipedia: “Open pollinated” generally refers to seeds that will “breed true.” When the plants of an open-pollinated variety self-pollinate, or are pollinated by another representative of the same variety, the resulting seeds will produce plants roughly identical to their parents. This is in contrast to the seeds produced by plants that are the result of a recent cross (such as, but not confined to, an F1 hybrid), which are likely to show a wide variety of differing characteristics. Open-pollinated varieties are also often referred to as standard varieties or, when the seeds have been saved across generations or across several decades, heirloom varieties. While heirlooms are usually open-pollinated, open-pollinated seeds are not necessarily heirlooms; open-pollinated varieties are still being developed.

One of the challenges in maintaining an open-pollinated variety is avoiding introduction of pollen from other strains. Based on how broadly the pollen for the plant tends to disperse, it can be controlled to varying degrees by greenhouses, tall wall enclosures, field isolation, or other techniques.

Because they breed true, the seeds of open-pollinated plants are often saved by home gardeners and farmers. Popular examples of open-pollinated plants include heirloom tomatoes, beans, peas, and many other garden vegetables.